Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Revenge and Gender in Classical, Medieval and Renaissance Literature$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Lesel Dawson and Fiona McHardy

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781474414098

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474414098.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 16 September 2021

Why are the Erinyes Female? or, What is so Feminine about Revenge?

Why are the Erinyes Female? or, What is so Feminine about Revenge?

Chapter:
(p.33) Chapter 1 Why are the Erinyes Female? or, What is so Feminine about Revenge?
Source:
Revenge and Gender in Classical, Medieval and Renaissance Literature
Author(s):

Edith Hall

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474414098.003.0002

This chapter focuses on the literary depictions of the Erinyes as personifications of revenge in order to draw conclusions about the gendering of revenge in ancient Greek thought. It asks why the Greeks envisaged the supernatural agents of punishment as female, when acts of blood revenge were typically enacted by men against other men to preserve their honour and attack their enemies. Demonstrating how Erinyes’ gender derives from a variety of sources, including their association with chthonic, thanatological and maternal forces and their links to other mythological figures (such as the Gorgons and Harpies), the chapter argues that the furies should in fact be regarded as ‘transgender’.

Keywords:   Erinyes, Gorgons, Harpies, revenge, gender, transgender, gendering of revenge

Edinburgh Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.