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Recognition in the Arabic Narrative TraditionDiscovery, Deliverance and Delusion$
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Philip F. Kennedy

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781474413725

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474413725.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 05 August 2021

Intertextuality and Reading: The Myth of Deliverance in al-Faraj baʿd al-Shiddah

Intertextuality and Reading: The Myth of Deliverance in al-Faraj baʿd al-Shiddah

Chapter:
(p.187) 4 Intertextuality and Reading: The Myth of Deliverance in al-Faraj baʿd al-Shiddah
Source:
Recognition in the Arabic Narrative Tradition
Author(s):

Philip F. Kennedy

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474413725.003.0005

Medieval Arabic anecdote collections regularly contain pious stories of deliverance (faraj) after distress (shiddah) in which recognition inflects the relief with which such narratives tend to end. These stories cater to and display popular sentiment on the whole, though they are preserved in highbrow belles-lettristic (adab) collections of prose. Their stories are those that mark and signal their identities – the story of their shared diaspora – and in this sense they are classic ‘hommes recits’, though accounts of their tribulations are relatively bare given the brevity of the tale. Their childhood severance becomes the very foretoken of their reunion, which is in the end a happy paradox.

Keywords:   Arabic Narrative, Intertextuality, Qur’an, Epistemology, Arabic Literary Tradition, Recognition, Faraj, Shiddah, adab

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