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Rethinking the Hollywood Teen MovieGender, Genre and Identity$
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Frances Smith

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781474413091

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474413091.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 27 September 2021

Looking Back: Nostalgia, Postfeminism and the Teen Movie

Looking Back: Nostalgia, Postfeminism and the Teen Movie

Chapter:
(p.105) 5. Looking Back: Nostalgia, Postfeminism and the Teen Movie
Source:
Rethinking the Hollywood Teen Movie
Author(s):

Frances Smith

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474413091.003.0005

Throughout this book, it has been clear that the Hollywood teen movie has close links with the youth culture of its time. Yet as this chapter will demonstrate, this equation between contemporary youth culture and the Hollywood films that claim to represent it is not nearly as clear-cut as one might expect. For Timothy Shary, the genre is trapped in a peculiar double bind that determines its relationship with the past: while film-makers aggressively target a youth audience, young people themselves lack the experience or means to produce amass-market feature film, as a result of which, these representations of youth are ‘filtered through an adult lens’. An oblique refraction of the youth culture of the past – often that of the director themselves – can therefore be regarded as a central feature of the genre as a whole.

Keywords:   American Graffiti, Constructing the Past, Dirty Dancing, Troubling Utopia, Easy A, Postfeminist, Allusivity, Nostalgia, Diegetic audience

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