Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Ancient Greece on British Television$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Fiona Hobden and Amanda Wrigley

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781474412599

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474412599.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 15 October 2019

The Odyssey in the ‘Broom Cupboard’: Ulysses 31 and Odysseus: The Greatest Hero of Them All on Children’s BBC, 1985–1986

The Odyssey in the ‘Broom Cupboard’: Ulysses 31 and Odysseus: The Greatest Hero of Them All on Children’s BBC, 1985–1986

Chapter:
(p.147) 7 The Odyssey in the ‘Broom Cupboard’: Ulysses 31 and Odysseus: The Greatest Hero of Them All on Children’s BBC, 1985–1986
Source:
Ancient Greece on British Television
Author(s):

Sarah Miles

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474412599.003.0008

The chapter examines two 1980s children’s television series – Odysseus: The Greatest Hero of Them All (hereafter Odysseus) and Ulysses 31 – which reworked the myths of the Greek hero Odysseus which derive from Homer’s Odyssey, an epic poem. The discussion demonstrates how each programme was shaped by contemporary culture, particularly film, television and animation. In particular, they combined: innovative storytelling techniques (e.g. Odysseus was a Jackanory-style story to camera, written and performed by Tony Robinson with Richard Curtis as co-writer) with creative use of the mode of television and televisual animation (e.g. Ulysses 31 was created by key names in animation and anime: Jean Chalopin, Bernard Deyriès, Nagahama Tadao) and detailed knowledge of The Odyssey and wider Greek myth. The series provide contrasting localised (British) and international (Franco-Japanese) production contexts, but in the UK both programmes were first broadcast in 1985-1986 via the newly created children’s programming format, Children’s BBC, known affectionately as the ‘Broom Cupboard’, in which a studio-presenter addressed child-audiences directly. Odysseus and Ulysses 31 therefore offered sustained engagements with the myths of Odysseus for UK-based children in this decade.

Keywords:   Homer , Odyssey, Odysseus: The Greatest Hero of Them All, Ulysses 31, children’s television, Children’s BBC, Broom Cupboard, animation, anime, on-location filming

Edinburgh Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.