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Women's Periodicals and Print Culture in Britain, 1918-1939The Interwar Period$
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Catherine Clay, Maria DiCenzo, Barbara Green, and Fiona Hackney

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781474412537

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474412537.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 28 September 2021

A Periodical of Their Own: Feminist Writing in Religious Print Media

A Periodical of Their Own: Feminist Writing in Religious Print Media

Chapter:
(p.435) 28 A Periodical of Their Own: Feminist Writing in Religious Print Media
Source:
Women's Periodicals and Print Culture in Britain, 1918-1939
Author(s):

Jacqueline R. deVries

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474412537.003.0034

In this volume’s rich survey of women’s print media in the interwar period, it might be surprising to find a chapter on feminist writing in religious periodicals – that is, if one assumes that Britain’s religious traditions were inhospitable contexts for feminist organising during this time period. But that assumption would not be entirely correct. The Anglican, Catholic, and Jewish communities in Britain – the three traditions explored here – certainly clung to theological and institutional structures that prevented women from moving freely or quickly into leadership roles. But these communities were never homogenous and their members expressed a wide range of attitudes about gender, sexuality, and women’s roles, some of which were highly progressive and found their way into print. The changing social and gender norms of the interwar period were much debated topics in Britain’s religious communities, and through their engagement with religious media, women found ways to influence those debates.

Keywords:   women’s periodicals, women’s magazines, interwar, British, feminism, women readers, modernism, fashion, domestic magazines, popular magazines

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