Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Women's Periodicals and Print Culture in Britain, 1918-1939The Interwar Period$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Catherine Clay, Maria DiCenzo, Barbara Green, and Fiona Hackney

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781474412537

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474412537.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 28 September 2021

The Essay Series and Feminist Debate: Controversy and Conversation about Women and Work In Time and Tide

The Essay Series and Feminist Debate: Controversy and Conversation about Women and Work In Time and Tide

Chapter:
(p.333) 21 The Essay Series and Feminist Debate: Controversy and Conversation about Women and Work In Time and Tide
Source:
Women's Periodicals and Print Culture in Britain, 1918-1939
Author(s):

Laurel Forster

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474412537.003.0026

This chapter considers the ways in which the feminist periodical, Time and Tide, founded by Lady Margaret Rhondda along with the Six Point Group, used the adaptable journalistic device of the essay series to engage its readers in current and pressing debates about women. In the uncertainties and upheavals of postwar Britain, roles for women were unclear and undetermined, and the capacious form of the essay series, combined with skilful editorship, facilitated a range of experts and varied voices to discuss sometimes contentious issues of women's leisure, education, motherhood and working lives. Time and Tide made full use of the journal's periodicity to ensure that it became a forum for debate about women's domestic and professional occupations, and determinedly engaged its readers by printing extensive reader and expert correspondence and then providing editorial responses to those letters and interventions. There was even a staged public meeting, broadcast on BBC radio.

Keywords:   Time and Tide, essay series, women's work, occupation, leisure, correspondence, periodicity, Six Point Group, Lady Rhondda, BBC radio

Edinburgh Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.