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Women's Periodicals and Print Culture in Britain, 1918-1939The Interwar Period$
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Catherine Clay, Maria DiCenzo, Barbara Green, and Fiona Hackney

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781474412537

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474412537.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 22 September 2021

Woman Appeal. A New Rhetoric of Consumption: Women’s Domestic Magazines in the 1920s and 1930s

Woman Appeal. A New Rhetoric of Consumption: Women’s Domestic Magazines in the 1920s and 1930s

Chapter:
(p.294) 19 Woman Appeal. A New Rhetoric of Consumption: Women’s Domestic Magazines in the 1920s and 1930s
Source:
Women's Periodicals and Print Culture in Britain, 1918-1939
Author(s):

Fiona Hackney

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474412537.003.0023

The launch of over fifty titles put women and their magazines at the forefront of popular publishing in the interwar years. The buoyant market opened new opportunities for women as writers, on the editorial side, in publicity, art departments, and related areas such as advertising, in order to better ‘appeal to women’ and articulate the ‘woman’s point of view’. Driven by commercial imperatives–women were considered to hold the purse strings of the nation–woman appeal, nevertheless, signalled a more nuanced understanding of female psychology and a gendered perspective on life. This chapter examines how it was constructed in the domestic monthly Modern Woman in the 1920s, and popular weeklies Woman’s Weekly and Woman in the 1930s. It argues that while simultaneously serving to reinforce accepted notions of womanhood, the complex relationship between editorial and advertising produced a hybrid environment in magazines that offered their widening readerships a space to imagine other versions of womanhood which, albeit quietly, challenged established class and gender norms.

Keywords:   advertising, editorial, woman appeal, woman’s point of view, Modern Woman, Woman’s Weekly, Woman, hybrid

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