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Women's Periodicals and Print Culture in Britain, 1918-1939The Interwar Period$
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Catherine Clay, Maria DiCenzo, Barbara Green, and Fiona Hackney

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781474412537

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474412537.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 21 September 2021

The Picturegoer: Cinema, Rotogravure, and the Reshaping of the Female Face

The Picturegoer: Cinema, Rotogravure, and the Reshaping of the Female Face

Chapter:
(p.185) 12 The Picturegoer: Cinema, Rotogravure, and the Reshaping of the Female Face
Source:
Women's Periodicals and Print Culture in Britain, 1918-1939
Author(s):

Gerry Beegan

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474412537.003.0015

The Picturegoer, published by Odhams Press, was the most popular British interwar film magazine. It was a pioneer in the use of rotogravure, a technique that brought high-quality color images to popular periodicals. The gravure process, in which both letterforms and photographs were fundamentally pictorial, challenged the text/image hierarchy, a radical shift reflected in the magazine’s layouts. Rotogravure had no definable matrix and images were smooth, continuous, and delicate; photographic portraits of stars were visually akin to cinematic close-ups. The magazine’s heavily retouched images, alongside articles on fashion and make-up, and an increasing dominance of cosmetic advertising, enabled women to develop an empowering visual expertise. Appearance became democratized and malleable, helping women to negotiate the contradictions of modern female subjectivity. Female readers were able to develop a photogenic face, influenced by Hollywood, shaped by make-up, and modeled on the smooth retouched colour rotogravure

Keywords:   The Picturegoer, rotogravure, make-up, cosmetics, Odhams

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