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Women's Periodicals and Print Culture in Britain, 1918-1939The Interwar Period$
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Catherine Clay, Maria DiCenzo, Barbara Green, and Fiona Hackney

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781474412537

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474412537.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 21 September 2021

‘A Journal of the Period’: Modernism and Conservative Modernity in Eve: The Lady’s Pictorial (1919–29)

‘A Journal of the Period’: Modernism and Conservative Modernity in Eve: The Lady’s Pictorial (1919–29)

Chapter:
(p.28) 2 ‘A Journal of the Period’: Modernism and Conservative Modernity in Eve: The Lady’s Pictorial (1919–29)
Source:
Women's Periodicals and Print Culture in Britain, 1918-1939
Author(s):

Vike Martina Plock

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474412537.003.0004

This chapter examines and puts into context the ‘modernist turn’ of Eve: The Lady’s Pictorial, a popular fashion magazine marketed to middle-class female readers in the interwar period (1919-1929). While many of its society columns and features unquestionably endorsed traditional, patriarchal values, the fact that editors also reviewed and commissioned work by modernist women writers such as Elizabeth Bowen, Radclyffe Hall, Storm Jameson, Rosamond Lehmann, Jean Rhys, Sylvia Townsend Warner and Virginia Woolf, shows that the magazine was fashioned as a dialogic space that aimed to address the various, at times contradictory, experiences and interests of women in the interwar period.  By analysing the particulars of this productive dialogue between conservatism and progressiveness in Eve, the chapter advances research on interwar periodical culture, suggesting that some existing critical designations such as ‘little,’ ‘smart,’ or ‘service’ inadequately describe the heterogeneity of the printed materials found in this particular 1920s magazine.

Keywords:   Eve: The Lady’s Pictorial, domesticity, modernism, women writers, nationalism, Radclyffe Hall, Rosamond Lehmann, conservative modernity, fashion magazine

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