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The New Russian Nationalism"Imperialism, Ethnicity and Authoritarianism 2000-2015"$
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Pål Kolstø and Helge Blakkisrud

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781474410427

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474410427.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 14 October 2019

Everyday nationalism in Russia in European context: Moscow residents’ perceptions of ethnic minority migrants and migration

Everyday nationalism in Russia in European context: Moscow residents’ perceptions of ethnic minority migrants and migration

Chapter:
(p.132) 5 Everyday nationalism in Russia in European context: Moscow residents’ perceptions of ethnic minority migrants and migration
Source:
The New Russian Nationalism
Author(s):

Natalya Kosmarskaya

Igor Savin

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474410427.003.0006

This chapteranalyses perceptions of immigrants among Muscovites.Throughout the post-Soviet period, the Russian capital has been a magnet for labour migrants from the poverty-and/or war-stricken Caucasus, as well as from parts of Central Asia. The authors examine how the main factors that provoke anti-migrant attitudes and migrantophobia elsewhere in Europe may operate also under the social conditions of the largest city in Russia.They find that respondents contextualize the ‘migration issue’ primarily within a wider social setting in Moscow: in their narratives, they associate migrants much more with disturbances of social/political life in Russia/Moscow in general than with any alleged ‘ethno-cultural otherness’. The actual migrants whom Muscovites meet in everyday life in various parts of the city are usually not perceived through any ‘threat’ lens.

Keywords:   everyday nationalism, Moscow, labour migrants, migrantophobia, Caucasus, Central Asia

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