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Masculinities on ClydesideMen in Reserved Occupations During the Second World War$
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Alison Chand

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781474409360

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474409360.001.0001

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Re-negotiated Social Relationships: Women in Reserved Occupations in Glasgow and Clydeside

Re-negotiated Social Relationships: Women in Reserved Occupations in Glasgow and Clydeside

Chapter:
(p.104) Chapter Five Re-negotiated Social Relationships: Women in Reserved Occupations in Glasgow and Clydeside
Source:
Masculinities on Clydeside
Author(s):

Alison Chand

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474409360.003.0005

This chapter acknowledges that men working in reserved occupations did not live and work in vacuums but in communities alongside other civilians, notably women. The chapter looks at women’s experiences of working in reserved occupations in Clydeside, including their feelings of contribution to the war effort, self fulfilment in work and, in some cases, dislike of work and lack of attachment to the war effort. The chapter also examines the extent to which the subjectivities of working women could be described as uniquely regional during the war, moving towards an understanding of the separate subjectivities of men and women as existing in ‘living’ communities and relationships in history, where the abstractions of social and cultural discourse are inextricably intertwined with the physical realities of day-to-day existence. A central argument is that women’s wartime work in Clydeside was representative of re-negotiated relationships with the men in their communities rather than destabilising masculinity. The chapter also looks at the wider subjectivities of women in reserved occupations and the importance to them of place.

Keywords:   ‘Women in reserved occupations’, ‘The auxiliary services’, ‘Regional subjectivities’, ‘Continuity’

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