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ContactThe Interaction of Closely Related Linguistic Varieties and the History of English$
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Robert McColl Millar

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781474409087

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474409087.001.0001

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New dialect formation and time depth

New dialect formation and time depth

Chapter:
(p.57) 3 New dialect formation and time depth
Source:
Contact
Author(s):

Robert McColl Millar

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474409087.003.0003

Linguists have generally studied new dialect formation in varieties with relatively little time depth. In this chapter greater depth is considered in relation to the development of the Scots dialects of Orkney and Shetland, Irish English and Ulster Scots. While lengthier periods of contact do make analysis of the original impact more difficult, it is shown that essentially the same processes have been at work in these contexts as was the case in more recent contacts. Given their contact with the native North Germanic variety of the Northern Isles, the Shetland and Orkney examples lead us into the themes of the next two chapters.

Keywords:   English, Scots, Contact Linguistics, Historical Linguistics, Sociolinguistics, Koineisation

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