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STARZ SpartacusReimagining an Icon on Screen$
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Antony Augoustakis and Monica Cyrino

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781474407847

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474407847.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 20 September 2021

Violence and Voyeurism in the Arena

Violence and Voyeurism in the Arena

Chapter:
(p.211) 13 Violence and Voyeurism in the Arena
Source:
STARZ Spartacus
Author(s):

Hunter H. Gardner

Amanda Potter

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474407847.003.0014

This chapter explores the different forms of violence portrayed in the series—principally the gladiatorial violence in the arena; violence in the streets, including beatings and murders; and sexual violence perpetrated on slaves but also on Roman citizens. It points out that through scenes of graphic bodily dismemberments and eviscerations, the series asks its audience to contemplate the difficult distinction between morally justified bloodshed and the fetishized conventions of gore, conventions popularized in various subgenres of the horror film, in particular the “splatter film” and the “meat flick.” Despite its slippery tendency to celebrate violence both attached and unattached to a moral perspective, the chapter maintains that the series offers a unique window on the embodiment of violence in the ancient world.

Keywords:   violence, voyeurism, gladiatorial violence, morally justified bloodshed, fetishized gore, horror film, ancient world

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