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The Pre-Raphaelites and OrientalismLanguage and Cognition in Remediations of the East$
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Eleonora Sasso

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9781474407168

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: January 2019

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474407168.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 28 May 2020

Consumers of Intoxicating Fruits and Elixirs: The Cognitive Grammar of Christina Rossetti’s and Ford Madox Ford’s Oriental Fairy Tales

Consumers of Intoxicating Fruits and Elixirs: The Cognitive Grammar of Christina Rossetti’s and Ford Madox Ford’s Oriental Fairy Tales

Chapter:
(p.103) Chapter 4 Consumers of Intoxicating Fruits and Elixirs: The Cognitive Grammar of Christina Rossetti’s and Ford Madox Ford’s Oriental Fairy Tales
Source:
The Pre-Raphaelites and Orientalism
Author(s):

Eleonora Sasso

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474407168.003.0005

The fourth chapter provides a cognitive grammar analysis of Christina Rossetti’s and Ford’s Oriental fairy poetry and narrative fictionalising scenes of drug consumption. Like consumers of banj (hashish) and opium, Rossetti’s and Ford’s characters (the petrified banqueters, Laura, the princess wearing poppies, Queen Eldrida, Princess Ismara and the blind ploughman) experience moments of hallucination caused by intoxicating fruits, elixirs of life and infusions of wind-flowers. Probably written in reaction to the Opium War, which facilitated the diffusion of opium-based laudanum, used for recreational purposes and health remedies, Rossetti’s ‘The Dead City’, ‘Goblin Market’ and ‘The Prince’s Progress’, as well as Ford’s The Brown Owl (1892), The Feather (1892) and The Queen Who Flew blend together parts of Oriental narratives in order to visualise the temptations of the East.

Keywords:   Christina Rossetti, Ford Madox Ford, Opium, Intoxicating fruits, Elixirs of life, Fairy tales

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