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Higher Education in Scotland and the UKDiverging or Converging Systems?$
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Sheila Riddell, Elisabet Weedon, and Sarah Minty

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781474404587

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474404587.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 29 March 2020

Widening Access to Higher Education in Scotland, the UK and Europe

Widening Access to Higher Education in Scotland, the UK and Europe

Chapter:
(p.90) 6 Widening Access to Higher Education in Scotland, the UK and Europe
Source:
Higher Education in Scotland and the UK
Author(s):

Elisabet Weedon

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474404587.003.0006

This chapter examines strategies to promote widening access across the four nations of the UK, with the main focus on Scotland and England. A central question is whether, in the light of devolution, widening access is an area characterised by a greater degree of convergence or divergence (Gallacher and Raffe, 2012). In line with the goals of the Bologna Process, it is also interesting to consider whether within the EU there is evidence of higher education convergence across EU member states and other countries within the European Higher Education Area. These issues are explored using administrative data from the Scottish Funding Council (SFC), the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA), Eurostat and the Eurostudent survey. In addition, we also draw on data from interviews with key informants which were conducted as part of the ESRC project.

Keywords:   Widening access, independence, Scotland, England, higher education

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