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Nine Centuries of ManManhood and Masculinity in Scottish History$
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Lynn Abrams and Elizabeth L. Ewan

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781474403894

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474403894.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 02 August 2021

Making a Manly Impression: The Image of Kingship on Scottish Royal Seals of the High Middle Ages

Making a Manly Impression: The Image of Kingship on Scottish Royal Seals of the High Middle Ages

Chapter:
(p.101) 5 Making a Manly Impression: The Image of Kingship on Scottish Royal Seals of the High Middle Ages
Source:
Nine Centuries of Man
Author(s):

Cynthia J. Neville

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474403894.003.0006

A central aspect of the growing sophistication of government in thirteenth-century Scotland was the crown’s use of written deeds authenticated with the great seal as instruments through which to express the royal will. This chapter, using sigillography (the study of seals) argues that over the course of the high and later Middle Ages the rulers of Scotland demonstrated a keen interest in the images, words and symbols that appeared on their great seals, encoding into these objects a complex and constantly evolving series of messages about their conceptualisation of kingship. The decorated surface of the seal and its accompanying Latin-language legend offered the kings a unique medium through which to project powerful images of Scottish identity, masculinity and power.

Keywords:   seals, Scotland, sigillography, kingship, government, royal authority, masculinity

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