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Islamic Law and Empire in Ottoman Cairo$
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James E. Baldwin

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9781474403092

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474403092.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 14 October 2019

The privatization of justice: dispute resolution as a domain of political competition

The privatization of justice: dispute resolution as a domain of political competition

Chapter:
(p.99) Chapter 5 The privatization of justice: dispute resolution as a domain of political competition
Source:
Islamic Law and Empire in Ottoman Cairo
Author(s):

James E. Baldwin

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474403092.003.0006

Chapter 5 explores how Cairo’s political notables began to resolve disputes among the city’s population during the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, encroaching on the jurisdictions of long-established Ottoman legal institutions. This development saw justice become enmeshed in the patron-client networks and factional antagonism of Cairo’s politics. Using contemporary chronicles, the chapter also explores what eighteenth-century Cairenes thought of their city’s legal system. It shows that in some cases, chroniclers were critical of the official courts’ passivity and cautious adherence to procedure, and saw powerful men using intelligence, cunning and violence to investigate wrongdoing as a superior guarantee of justice.

Keywords:   Political notables, Privatization, Janissary regiment, Beys, Arabic chronicles, Procedure, Torture

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