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Islamic Thought in ChinaSino-Muslim Intellectual Evolution from the 17th to the 21st Century$
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Jonathan Lipman

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781474402279

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474402279.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 20 October 2019

Secularisation and Modernisation of Islam in China: Educational Reform, Japanese Occupation and the Disappearance of Persian Learning

Secularisation and Modernisation of Islam in China: Educational Reform, Japanese Occupation and the Disappearance of Persian Learning

Chapter:
(p.171) 7 Secularisation and Modernisation of Islam in China: Educational Reform, Japanese Occupation and the Disappearance of Persian Learning
Source:
Islamic Thought in China
Author(s):

Masumi Matsumoto

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474402279.003.0007

This chapter describes the rise of modern Islamic schooling in China and the disappearance of the traditional curriculum, partially based on Persian textbooks on the unity of being (wahdat al-wujūd). In the 1920s and 1930s, Islamic reformism became popular among city dwellers in the Chinese coastal regions. They wanted to foster bilingual (Chinese and Arabic) religious and educational leaders who accepted modern schooling, to require Chinese literacy of Muslim students and to promote nation building against foreign pressures. They judged that the traditional learning in both Arabic and Persian was both too time-consuming and ineffective in legitimizing Sino-Muslims’ presence in Chinese society. In Japan’s occupied area during the Anti-Japanese War, however, Persian learning was preserved by some non-political members of Sino-Muslim society. Persian learning is now rapidly disappearing in China, especially since the political turmoil of the Anti-Rightist Campaign and the Cultural Revolution.

Keywords:   Islamic reformism, Persian learning, Unity of Being, madrasa, Islamic education, Japanese occupation

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