Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Post-Liberal Peace TransitionsBetween Peace Formation and State Formation$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Oliver P. Richmond and Sandra Pogodda

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781474402170

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474402170.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 27 July 2021

Incompatibility, Substitution or Complementarity? Interrogating Relationships between International, State and Non-State Peace Agents in Post-Conflict Solomon Islands

Incompatibility, Substitution or Complementarity? Interrogating Relationships between International, State and Non-State Peace Agents in Post-Conflict Solomon Islands

Chapter:
(p.197) 10 Incompatibility, Substitution or Complementarity? Interrogating Relationships between International, State and Non-State Peace Agents in Post-Conflict Solomon Islands
Source:
Post-Liberal Peace Transitions
Author(s):

Volker Boege

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474402170.003.0011

This concluding chapter illustrates how, in the Soloman Islands, very significant agency lies at the social level of peacemaking. In July 2003, after several years of internal violent conflicts, the Solomon Islands became the target of the biggest peacebuilding intervention in the Pacific region to date — the Regional Assistance Mission to the Solomon Islands (RAMSI). This mission is generally presented as a success story of post-conflict peacebuilding and statebuilding. The chapter shows how locals have pursued their own indigenous processes of peace formation detached from, and parallel to, RAMSI, albeit in its shadow. It draws mainly on field research into community views on the capacities, effectiveness, and legitimacy of international, state, and local, non-state agents of peace and state formation, using the categories of incompatibility, substitution, and complementarity to analyse the approaches and practices of these actors.

Keywords:   Solomon Islands, peacemaking, Regional Assistance Mission to the Solomon Islands, post-conflict peacebuilding, post-conflict statebuilding, local peace formation, non-state peace agents

Edinburgh Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.