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Post-Liberal Peace TransitionsBetween Peace Formation and State Formation$
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Oliver P. Richmond and Sandra Pogodda

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781474402170

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474402170.001.0001

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Introduction: The Contradictions of Peace, International Architecture, the State, and Local Agency

Introduction: The Contradictions of Peace, International Architecture, the State, and Local Agency

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction: The Contradictions of Peace, International Architecture, the State, and Local Agency
Source:
Post-Liberal Peace Transitions
Author(s):

Oliver P. Richmond

Sandra Pogodda

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474402170.003.0001

This introductory chapter provides an overview of the four cornerstones in the relationship between different forms of conflict and peace. State formation describes the formation of the state through indigenous or internal violence between competing groups and their agendas which often turn the state into a criminal and predatory elite racket. Statebuilding is the resultant externalised process aimed at rectifying this situation. Peacebuilding focuses on external support for liberally oriented, rights-based institutions with a special and legitimating focus on norms and human rights, civil society, and a social contract via representative institutions embedded in a rule of law. Lastly, peace formation processes can be defined as the mobilisation — formal or informal, public or hidden, indigenous — of local agents of peacebuilding, conflict resolution, development, or peace actors in customary, religious, cultural, social, or local governance settings. The chapter then outlines the theoretical debates about state formation and statebuilding as well as the critique of liberal statebuilding/peacebuilding that has emerged.

Keywords:   state formation, statebuilding, peacebuilding, peace formation, local agents, conflict resolution, peace actors, internal violence

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