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American Gothic CultureAn Edinburgh Companion$
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Jason Haslam and Joel Faflak

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781474401616

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474401616.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 21 April 2021

Screening the American Gothic: Celluloid Serial Killers in American Popular Culture

Screening the American Gothic: Celluloid Serial Killers in American Popular Culture

Chapter:
(p.187) Chapter 10 Screening the American Gothic: Celluloid Serial Killers in American Popular Culture
Source:
American Gothic Culture
Author(s):

Sorcha Ní Fhlainn

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474401616.003.0011

This chapter situates the American gothic in post-1960 cinema and TV by exploring the distinctly American lineage of the modern serial killer. Landmark films chart seismic shifts in post-classical American cinema after the success of Hitchcock’s Psycho (1960), from The Texas Chain Saw Massacre (1973) to The Silence of the Lambs (1991), American Psycho (2000), and Dexter (2006-13). This Drawing upon the influence of real/reel American serial killers (Ed Gein, Ted Bundy), this chapter argues that the serial killer embodies the counter-narrative American Dream: the consumerist and consumption-driven American nightmare.

Keywords:   Gothic, Film, Horror, Serial killers

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