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American Gothic CultureAn Edinburgh Companion$
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Jason Haslam and Joel Faflak

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781474401616

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474401616.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 27 May 2020

Gothic Monstrosity: Charles Brockden Brown’s Edgar Huntly and the Trope of the Bestial Indian

Gothic Monstrosity: Charles Brockden Brown’s Edgar Huntly and the Trope of the Bestial Indian

Chapter:
(p.25) Chapter 1 Gothic Monstrosity: Charles Brockden Brown’s Edgar Huntly and the Trope of the Bestial Indian
Source:
American Gothic Culture
Author(s):

Christine Yao

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474401616.003.0002

This chapter reads the development and sedimentation of the savage image of American Indians in early American history through the American gothic’s monstrous tropes, concluding with 1799 novel Edgar Huntly by Charles Brockden Brown, acclaimed as the pioneer of American gothic. If for Brown the American equivalent to Gothic castles are the perils of the western wilderness, Native Americans are the monstrous equivalent of that setting’s mythical chimera. Both inhuman and antagonistic Other, for Brown the Indian, at once integral and liminal, is a quintessential element of the American gothic genre.

Keywords:   Charles Brockden Brown, Edgar Huntly, Indigenous Peoples, Gothic

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