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African, American and European Trajectories of ModernityPast Oppression, Future Justice?$
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Peter Wagner

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9781474400404

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474400404.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 28 March 2020

Inconsistencies between Social-democratic Discourses and Neo-liberal Institutional Development in Chile and South Africa: a Comparative Analysis of the Post-authoritarian Periods1

Inconsistencies between Social-democratic Discourses and Neo-liberal Institutional Development in Chile and South Africa: a Comparative Analysis of the Post-authoritarian Periods1

Chapter:
(p.125) 6 Inconsistencies between Social-democratic Discourses and Neo-liberal Institutional Development in Chile and South Africa: a Comparative Analysis of the Post-authoritarian Periods1
Source:
African, American and European Trajectories of Modernity
Author(s):

Rommy Morales Olivares

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474400404.003.0007

This chapter examines how economic policies in post-authoritarian societies are influenced by policies formulated during previous authoritarian periods, as well as the mechanisms that lead to the continuity of an economic policy framework that allows the perpetuation of social inequality. The discussion centers on the relatively high degree of continuity in economic policy-making in Chile and South Africa, which have been examples of the neo-liberal reforms of the capitalist periphery and offer an additional complexity, and on the discursive level at which the economic and institutional development of both countries has been formulated. After a brief overview of both nations' historical contexts, the chapter offers a socioeconomic analysis of Chile's post-authoritarian period and compares it with South Africa's post-authoritarian period. It highlights five mechanisms of institutional continuity, which may serve as hypotheses to explain the neo-liberal trajectories of both countries.

Keywords:   economic policy, post-authoritarian societies, social inequality, economic policy-making, Chile, South Africa, neo-liberal reforms, economic development, institutional development, institutional continuity

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