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The Many Voices of Lydia DavisTranslation, Rewriting, Intertextuality$
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Jonathan Evans

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9781474400176

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9781474400176.001.0001

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Marie Curie and Parody

Marie Curie and Parody

Chapter:
(p.110) Chapter 6 Marie Curie and Parody
Source:
The Many Voices of Lydia Davis
Author(s):

Jonathan Evans

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9781474400176.003.0006

This chapter focuses on Davis’s story ‘Marie Cure, So Honorable Woman’. This story challenges the boundary between translation and writing as it is constructed from overly literal translation fragments from a biography of Marie Curie that Davis had translated in a more conventional way elsewhere. Beginning with the publication history of the story, the chapter argues that it can be read as a form of parody of the original text through the selection of material presented and through the expressly unidiomatic translation style, although at the same time the source text is not as well-known as might be expected of parodies. Through its use of style, the story questions the role of representation in translation and biography. How a story is told is shown to be central to the understanding of that story.

Keywords:   Marie Curie, Appropriation, Translational poetics, Biography, Representation

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