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Hollywood and the Great DepressionAmerican Film, Politics and Society in the 1930s$
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Iwan Morgan and Philip John Davies

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780748699926

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748699926.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 26 September 2021

Introduction: Hollywood and the Great Depression

Introduction: Hollywood and the Great Depression

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction: Hollywood and the Great Depression
Source:
Hollywood and the Great Depression
Author(s):

Iwan Morgan

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748699926.003.0001

This examines the economic impact of the Great Depression on Hollywood’s profitability in 1930-34 and how the film business changed in the course of seeking renewed financial success. It considers technological advances associated with the new dialogue-based medium, changes in movie genres and how particular studios became identified with these, the adaptation of the star system and its significance for studio profitability, and the move towards industry self-regulation with the establishment of the Production Code Administration in 1934.. It finally considers the New Deal’s response to monopoly in Hollywood and the Justice Department’s filing of the U.S. v Paramount et al suit in 1938

Keywords:   Hollywood studios, financial crisis, profitability, star system, New Deal

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