Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Muslims in IrelandPast and Present$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Oliver Scharbrodt, Tuula Sakaranaho, Adil Hussain Khan, Yafa Shanneik, and Vivian Ibrahim

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780748696888

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748696888.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 28 March 2020

Sailors, Merchants and Migrants

Sailors, Merchants and Migrants

From the Sack of Baltimore to World War II

Chapter:
(p.27) Chapter 1 Sailors, Merchants and Migrants
Source:
Muslims in Ireland
Author(s):

Vivian Ibrahim

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748696888.003.0002

The chapter examines the presence of Muslims in Ireland before World War II, placing it in the context of British colonial history of the 19th and early 20th centuries. This presence was constituted among others of merchants, sailors, wives of army officers or teachers of colonial officers at Irish universities. A communal presence as such did not emerge in this period. The chapter starts with the impact of the Sack of Baltimore of 1631, when North African corsairs sacked a small fishing in the West of Ireland, on Irish imaginations of Islam and Muslims in the 19th century. Irish encounters with the Muslim world and with Muslims living in Ireland at that time are placed in the context of British imperialism and the various Orientalist narratives underpinning it. As an illustrative example of this complex interaction, the chapter discusses the life and career of Mir Aulad Ali, a native of North India who was Professor of Oriental languages at Trinity College Dublin in the latter half of the 19th century.

Keywords:   Sack of Baltimore, Orientalism, British Empire, Mir Aulad Ali, James Joyce

Edinburgh Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.