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Studying Modern Arabic LiteratureMustafa Badawi, Scholar and Critic$
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Roger Allen and Robin Ostle

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780748696628

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748696628.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 17 September 2021

Does Literature Matter? The Relationship between Literature and Politics in Revolutionary Egypt

Does Literature Matter? The Relationship between Literature and Politics in Revolutionary Egypt

Chapter:
(p.194) 12 Does Literature Matter? The Relationship between Literature and Politics in Revolutionary Egypt
Source:
Studying Modern Arabic Literature
Author(s):

Elisabeth Kendall

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748696628.003.0013

This chapter explores the complex relationship between literature and politics in revolutionary Egypt. The 2011 revolution (and its ongoing aftermath) has sparked a wave of literary activity that is generally subject to two assumptions: first, it gave expression to the pulse of the Egyptian nation; second, it formed an integral part of the uprising, and possibly even played a role in inspiring and fuelling it. The chapter analyses both of these assumptions by discussing the ways in which politics can influence literature and vice versa. It also considers how the consumption of literature (particularly poetry) in contemporary Egypt affects political participation and democratic views. Drawing on the results of a survey conducted from December 2011 to January 2012, it shows that poetry consumers, whilst sharing with the general population their strong support for democracy, were more likely to support a strong leader taking non-democratic measures if necessary.

Keywords:   literature, politics, revolution, Egypt, political participation, poetry, democracy

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