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Studying Modern Arabic LiteratureMustafa Badawi, Scholar and Critic$
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Roger Allen and Robin Ostle

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780748696628

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748696628.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 17 September 2021

Jewish Arabs in the Israeli Asylum: A Literary Reflection1

Jewish Arabs in the Israeli Asylum: A Literary Reflection1

Chapter:
(p.139) 9 Jewish Arabs in the Israeli Asylum: A Literary Reflection1
Source:
Studying Modern Arabic Literature
Author(s):

Miriam Cooke

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748696628.003.0010

This chapter examines the lives and writings of a few Mizrahi Jews who succeeded in Israel despite the challenges they faced there. Focusing on the first wave of immigration and its aftermath through novels, poetry, autobiographies and films, this chapter uses the asylum metaphor to describe Israel. Initially, Israel was an asylum for European Jews (Ashkenazis) until they turned the asylum into their state. From that point on, they created asylums for various constituencies, including Jewish Arabs. The chapter also considers the process of acculturation in the asylum of Israeli transit camps, which has figured prominently in Mizrahi literature; how ‘foreigners’ in Israel achieved nationalisation through religion and not-religion; and the exodus of thousands of Iraqi Jews to Israel; the role of language in Jewish Arabs' self-fashioning in Israel; and the political awakening of Jewish Arab intellectuals.

Keywords:   transit camps, Mizrahi Jews, Israel, asylum metaphor, Jewish Arabs, acculturation, Mizrahi literature, Iraqi Jews, political awakening, Jewish Arab intellectuals

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