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Studying Modern Arabic LiteratureMustafa Badawi, Scholar and Critic$
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Roger Allen and Robin Ostle

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780748696628

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748696628.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 17 September 2021

Modern Arabic Literature as Seen in the Late Nineteenth Century: Jurji Murqus’s Contribution to Korsh and Kirpichnikov’s Vseobshchaya Istoriya Literatury*

Modern Arabic Literature as Seen in the Late Nineteenth Century: Jurji Murqus’s Contribution to Korsh and Kirpichnikov’s Vseobshchaya Istoriya Literatury*

Chapter:
(p.83) 6 Modern Arabic Literature as Seen in the Late Nineteenth Century: Jurji Murqus’s Contribution to Korsh and Kirpichnikov’s Vseobshchaya Istoriya Literatury*
Source:
Studying Modern Arabic Literature
Author(s):

Hilary Kilpatrick

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748696628.003.0007

This chapter discusses modern Arabic literature as seen in the late nineteenth century by focusing on Jurji Ibrahim Murqus's contribution to Vseobshchaya Istoriya literatury (Universal History of Literature), edited by V. F. Korsh and A. I. Kirpichnikov. Murqus was a Syrian academic migrant who left Damascus in 1860. He studied at the Faculty of Oriental Languages of the University of St Petersburg and taught Arabic at the Lazarev Institute of Oriental Languages in Moscow. This chapter presents a slightly abridged rendering of Murqus's text, which concentrates on the evolution of the Arabic language, on prose writers and on translators. It also considers Murqus's position where prose genres are concerned, with particular emphasis on his recognition of the significance of travel writing, as well as his views on translation. Finally, it suggests that Mustafa Badawi would have disputed some of Murqus's statements on sound scholarly grounds.

Keywords:   modern Arabic literature, Jurji Ibrahim Murqus, Vseobshchaya Istoriya literatury, Arabic language, prose writers, translators, prose, travel writing, translation, Mustafa Badawi

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