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Scotland's Referendum and the MediaNational and International Perspectives$
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Neil Blain, David Hutchison, and Gerry Hassan

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780748696581

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748696581.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 06 July 2022

The Scottish Press Account: Narratives of the Independence Referendum and its Aftermath

The Scottish Press Account: Narratives of the Independence Referendum and its Aftermath

Chapter:
(p.46) 5 The Scottish Press Account: Narratives of the Independence Referendum and its Aftermath
Source:
Scotland's Referendum and the Media
Author(s):

Marina Dekavalla

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748696581.003.0005

This chapter adopts a partly theoretical approach to analysis of the discourse of Scottish press narratives on independence, focusing particularly on editorial coverage and detailing accounts from five daily morning and five Sunday titles. The approach utilizes Greimas’s work on narrative semiotics, and considers tropes in Scottish press accounts such as The Quest for Change and The Quest for Independence. In this manner the analysis finds consistent underlying meanings in the press narratives it examines, but likewise discovers coherence associated with the ‘change’ model, with increased devolution apparently seen by both press and public as a safer route to change than independence.

Keywords:   Scottish press, Greimas, narrative semiotics, political narrative

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