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Northern NeighboursScotland and Norway since 1800$
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John Bryden, Ottar Brox, and Lesley Riddoch

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780748696208

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748696208.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 15 October 2019

Agrarian Change in Scotland and Norway: Agricultural Production, Structures, Politics and Policies since 1800

Agrarian Change in Scotland and Norway: Agricultural Production, Structures, Politics and Policies since 1800

Chapter:
(p.63) Chapter 4 Agrarian Change in Scotland and Norway: Agricultural Production, Structures, Politics and Policies since 1800
Source:
Northern Neighbours
Author(s):

John Bryden

Agnar Hegrenes

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748696208.003.0004

This Chapter addresses differences in agrarian structures, politics and policies between Norway and Scotland. It identifies four key processes: (1) agrarian improvers acceleration of the first agrarian revolution in Scotland through forced enclosures and the dispossession of the peasantry (2) the impact of the free trade period and war time food shortages in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries (3) the elaboration of agrarian policy and state interventions in the interwar period, and (4) the consequences of the second agrarian revolution following the Second World War, including the Mansholt plan and subsequent EU policies. These processes help explain the emergence of a dual agrarian structure in Scotland as opposed to the smaller farm size and greater pluriactivity in Norway. Neither history corresponds either to Marxian theories of agrarian change or to those of ‘Modernisation’, but reflects a series of critical junctures and context-specific politics and contests between interests.

Keywords:   Agrarian revolution, enclosures, dispossession, peasantry, agrarian policy, modernization, agrarian politics

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