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Spaghetti Westerns at the CrossroadsStudies in Relocation, Transition and Appropriation$
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Austin Fisher

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780748695454

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748695454.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 15 October 2019

Malaysian Pirates, American Cowboys and the Marginalised Outlaw: Constructing Other-ed Adventurers in Italian Film

Malaysian Pirates, American Cowboys and the Marginalised Outlaw: Constructing Other-ed Adventurers in Italian Film

Chapter:
(p.67) Chapter 3 Malaysian Pirates, American Cowboys and the Marginalised Outlaw: Constructing Other-ed Adventurers in Italian Film
Source:
Spaghetti Westerns at the Crossroads
Author(s):

Aliza S. Wong

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748695454.003.0004

This chapter examines the ways in which a hero of the nineteenth century — a Malaysian pirate who, in his rescuing of the imperially downtrodden, the exploited, and the betrayed, spoke in actions and words with anti-imperialist flourish — became reimagined as a twentieth-century, post-war anti-hero by a director of westerns all'italiana who had, in his own films, fashioned a bandit, a ‘noble savage’, who opened the eyes of a Texas ranger to the corruption of the aristocracy and Orientalist assumptions. The first section introduces the nineteenth-century Italian children's author Emilio Salgari, and the hero of his most famous and well-loved novels: the pirate Sandokan. The second section analyzes Sergio Sollima's radical westerns, focusing on the protagonist of La resa dei conti and Corri, uomo, corri: Cuchillo, played by the Cuban-American-Italian actor Tomás Milián. The final section examines the ways in which Sollima melds his vision of the anarchic borderlands of the USA and Mexico with his imagining of the primitive wilds of Southeast Asia in his 1970s television series and films, bringing Sandokan, Salgari, and Sollima together.

Keywords:   Malaysian pirate, anti-hero, westerns all'italiana, Emilio Salgari, Sandokan, Sergio Sollima

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