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Muhammad IqbalEssays on the Reconstruction of Modern Muslim Thought$
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Chad Hillier and Basit Koshul

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780748695416

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748695416.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 12 November 2019

Reconstructing Islam in a Post-metaphysical Age: Muhammad Iqbal’s Interpretation of Immortality

Reconstructing Islam in a Post-metaphysical Age: Muhammad Iqbal’s Interpretation of Immortality

Chapter:
(p.142) 7 Reconstructing Islam in a Post-metaphysical Age: Muhammad Iqbal’s Interpretation of Immortality
Source:
Muhammad Iqbal
Author(s):

Christopher Scott McClure

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748695416.003.0007

This chapter examines the doctrine of immortality in Muhammad Iqbal's thought, flushing out its religious and social impact. Iqbal presents a thoroughly modern theory of immortality — one rooted in teleology rather than metaphysics. Immortality is understood in two ways: as personal immortality and immortality in history. These two kinds of immortality exist in tension with each other. Iqbal reinterprets the traditional Islamic conception of immortality and resurrection as a reward to it being a culmination of the life-process of ego. However, this vision of immortality depends upon human actions and these actions happen within a society and may even be political. The implications are far-reaching for religion and society, including the believers' freedom to interpret their own religion (ijtihad) and asserting a place in India's future.

Keywords:   immortality, Muhammad Iqbal, personal immortality, immortality in history, ego, human actions, ijtihad

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