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Muhammad IqbalEssays on the Reconstruction of Modern Muslim Thought$
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Chad Hillier and Basit Koshul

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780748695416

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748695416.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 05 June 2020

Achieving Humanity: Convergence between Henri Bergson and Muhammad Iqbal

Achieving Humanity: Convergence between Henri Bergson and Muhammad Iqbal

Chapter:
(p.33) 3 Achieving Humanity: Convergence between Henri Bergson and Muhammad Iqbal
Source:
Muhammad Iqbal
Author(s):

Souleymane Bachir Diagne

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748695416.003.0003

This chapter focuses on the ‘convergence’ between the philosophers Muhammad Iqbal and Henri Bergson on key philosophical concepts. At the centre of this encounter is the theory of the self (khudi). This vision of ego-unity challenges the empiricist and rationalistic theory of the self as a unity of consciousness and is rooted in the intuitive experience of reality rather than the fragmented sense-based experience of the world. For both philosophers, this intuitive experience of reality reveals an inherent unity of the vitality-empowered cosmos. This cosmology manifests itself in human societies, where the intuitively inspired creative openness of mystics and prophets founds and drives them forward towards new possibilities and horizons.

Keywords:   Muhammad Iqbal, Henri Bergson, khudi, ego-unity, self, intuitive experience, cosmos, cosmology, mystics, prophets

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