Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Katherine Mansfield and Literary Influence$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Sarah Ailwood and Melinda Harvey

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780748694419

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748694419.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 26 October 2021

‘God forgive me, Tchehov, for my impertinence’: Katherine Mansfield and the Art of Copying

‘God forgive me, Tchehov, for my impertinence’: Katherine Mansfield and the Art of Copying

Chapter:
(p.119) Chapter 9 ‘God forgive me, Tchehov, for my impertinence’: Katherine Mansfield and the Art of Copying
Source:
Katherine Mansfield and Literary Influence
Author(s):

Melinda Harvey

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748694419.003.0009

This chapter reexamines allegations that Katherine Mansfield copied her story ‘The Child-Who-Was-Tired’ from the Russian writer Anton Chekhov. It argues that Mansfield's copying of Chekhov's story was not an isolated incident but instead part of a continuum, a compositional practice that privileged copying over pure invention. Harvey contends that copying was ‘central to Mansfield’s writing process and, ultimately, artistic and personal vision’, and that her writing practice involved much more ‘notetaking, sketching, drafting and revising’ than John Middleton Murry’s mythologising of Mansfield as a solitary genius has allowed. Harvey identifies three modes of copying – appropriation, translation and emulation – that disrupt conventional linear approaches to understanding influence: a precursor may influence a descendant, rather than the other way around.

Keywords:   Katherine Mansfield, Anton Chekhov, Russian literature, literary influence, 'The-Child-Who-Was-Tired', modernism, plagiarism, copying, translation, imitation

Edinburgh Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.