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Violence in Islamic Thought from the Qur'an to the Mongols$
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Robert Gleave and István Kristó-Nagy

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780748694235

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748694235.001.0001

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Sexual Violence in Verse: The Case of Jiʿthin, Al-Farazdaq’s Sister

Sexual Violence in Verse: The Case of Jiʿthin, Al-Farazdaq’s Sister

Chapter:
Chapter 11 Sexual Violence in Verse: The Case of Jiʿthin, Al-Farazdaq’s Sister
Source:
Violence in Islamic Thought from the Qur'an to the Mongols
Author(s):

Geert Jan van Gelder

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748694235.003.0011

At some time towards the end of the first/seventh century, a relatively trivial incident took place.1 An Arab of the tribe of Tamīm called Hammām b. Ghālib visited a clan not his own, the Banū Minqar, also belonging to Tamīm. A woman, waking up her daughter called Ẓamyāʾ, found that a snake had crept into her clothes. She cried for help and Hammām, who happened to be nearby, chased the snake away by throwing some dust at it. The snake had probably been attracted by the warmth of the girl’s body; Hammām was attracted to it in turn: he touched the girl and kissed her, but she resisted and he left, making a mocking epigram on her and her clan. When her relatives heard this, they were angry and one of them called ʿAmr (or ʿImrān) b. Murra, who was sent to play a trick upon Hammām’s sister, Jiʿthin. ʿAmr lay in wait for her and approached her unawares when, at night, she left her tent ‘to do her business’. He put his hands on her hip and her leg and dragged her along for some distance. She cried out and when her tribesmen hastened to the scene ʿAmr fled. In another version, there were, in fact, three other men, who together with ʿAmr/ʿImrān dragged Jiʿthin from her tent.

Keywords:   Sexual Violence, Women, Verse, Jiʿthin, Al-Farazdaq

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