Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Violence in Islamic Thought from the Qur'an to the Mongols$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Robert Gleave and István Kristó-Nagy

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780748694235

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748694235.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 27 September 2021

Violence Against Women in Andalusi Historical Sources (Third/Ninth– Seventh/Thirteenth Centuries)

Violence Against Women in Andalusi Historical Sources (Third/Ninth– Seventh/Thirteenth Centuries)

Chapter:
(p.155) Chapter 10 Violence Against Women in Andalusi Historical Sources (Third/Ninth– Seventh/Thirteenth Centuries)
Source:
Violence in Islamic Thought from the Qur'an to the Mongols
Author(s):

Maribel Fierro

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748694235.003.0010

Episodes of violence in historical writings may reflect the use of topoi – an area of study that has considerably advanced our understanding of both Islamic historiography and history.1 For example, the attribution of unusually cruel behaviour to a particular ruler – notwithstanding the possibility that such behaviour may have a historical basis – is used to justify his deposition, especially when it coincides with dynastic change.2 Narratives of violence against women in medieval writings3 – still a much unexplored topic, especially as regards the Islamic world4 – appear, as indicated by Manuela Marín, in contexts dealing with the relationships linking women in a hierarchy of power to their husbands or masters,5 and also in those of social disorder (wars and armed conflicts).

Keywords:   Women, Violence, Andalusi, Islam, Historical Writings, Ibn Ḥafṣūn

Edinburgh Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.