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Violence in Islamic Thought from the Qur'an to the Mongols$
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Robert Gleave and István Kristó-Nagy

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780748694235

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748694235.001.0001

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Who Instigated Violence: A Rebelling Devil or a Vengeful God?

Who Instigated Violence: A Rebelling Devil or a Vengeful God?

Chapter:
(p.93) Chapter 6 Who Instigated Violence: A Rebelling Devil or a Vengeful God?
Source:
Violence in Islamic Thought from the Qur'an to the Mongols
Author(s):

István T. Kristó-Nagy*

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748694235.003.0006

The contrast between the attitude towards violence of the God of the Old Testament and the God of the New Testament was already explored by Marcion (d. c. 160 ad) before the advent of Islam and has been rediscovered again and again since.1 Marcion saw the former as the creator of the world and God of the law and the latter as the good God, the God of love.2 The character of the former reflects a community’s need for sanctified social norms, while the character of the latter shows the community’s and the individual’s longing for the hope of salvation.3 The God of the Qurʾān is also one of punishment and pardon. This chapter investigates the former aspect and focuses on: (1) the appearance of evil and violence in the universe as described in the Qurʾān; (2) the philosophical-theological questions revealed by this myth; and (3) its social implications.

Keywords:   Violence, God, Devil, Free Will, Evil, Good, Iblīs’ myth

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