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Violence in Islamic Thought from the Qur'an to the Mongols$
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Robert Gleave and István Kristó-Nagy

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780748694235

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2020

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748694235.001.0001

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Reading the Qurʾān on Jihād: Two Early Exegetical Texts

Reading the Qurʾān on Jihād: Two Early Exegetical Texts

Chapter:
Chapter 3 Reading the Qurʾān on Jihād: Two Early Exegetical Texts
Source:
Violence in Islamic Thought from the Qur'an to the Mongols
Author(s):

Andrew Rippin

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748694235.003.0003

Understanding the character of early jihād has been the focus of much scholarly effort. The relationship between those fighting and the political power of the caliph, the notion of the obligation and appropriateness of continued fighting and the role of the renunciant tradition among early fighters, especially those who become associated with the scholarly classes, are all issues that have drawn attention. 1 The challenges in tackling these issues are many and are primarily related to the limited number and nature of the early sources available to us to clarify the matter. Two early texts that focus on legal aspects of the Qurʾān comprise sources that have not yet been fully tapped in discussing these questions. One work is by Muqātil b. Sulaymān, who died in 150/767 and, while the text in question, Tafsīr al-Khams Miʾat Ā ya min al-Qurʾān al-Karīm, may have achieved its final form later in the second or even the third hijrī century, it represents some of the earliest Qurʾānic exegetical material we have available. The second work is by Abū ʿUbayd, who died in 224/838, and is devoted to abrogation in the Qurʾān (and, to a lesser extent, the Sunna), entitled Kitāb al-Nāsikh wa-l-mansūkh.

Keywords:   Qur’an, Jihad, Tafsīr al-Khams Miʾat Ā ya min al-Qurʾān al-Karīm, Kitāb al-Nāsikh wa-l-mansūkh, Muqātil b. Sulaymān, Abū ʿUbayd

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