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Films on IceCinemas of the Arctic$
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Scott MacKenzie and Anna Westerstahl Stenport

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780748694174

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2017

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748694174.001.0001

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Exercise Musk-Ox: The Challenges of Filming a Military Expedition in Canada’s Arctic

Exercise Musk-Ox: The Challenges of Filming a Military Expedition in Canada’s Arctic

Chapter:
(p.245) 18. Exercise Musk-Ox: The Challenges of Filming a Military Expedition in Canada’s Arctic
Source:
Films on Ice
Author(s):

Caroline Forcier Holloway

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748694174.003.0019

This chapter by Canadian film archivist Caroline Forcier Holloway examines the extreme difficulty filmmakers in the 1930s faced filming in the Arctic. Interviewing many Canadian filmmakers from the era, including pioneering cinematographer Roger Racine, Holloway uncovers how film practitioners discovered new ways of filming in the Arctic’s extreme cold, with the help of the National Film Board of Canada and Eastman Kodak. Forcier Holloway also examines Canadian government Department of Defense documents that outline the reasons for Canadian military exercises in the Arctic and the documentaries that were made about these manoeuvres, including the film Exercise Musk-Ox (1946), which was released as a newsreel as part of the National Film Board of Canada’s Canada Carries On series.

Keywords:   Canadian cinema, Documentary, National Film Board of Canada, World War II, Roger Racine, Eastman Kodak, Exercise Musk-Ox, Canada Carries On

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