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Drawn from LifeIssues and Themes in Animated Documentary Cinema$
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Jonathan Murray and Nea Ehrlich

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780748694112

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2021

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748694112.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2022. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 17 May 2022

Animated Documentary, Recollection, ‘Re-enactment’ and Temporality

Animated Documentary, Recollection, ‘Re-enactment’ and Temporality

Chapter:
(p.69) Chapter 4 Animated Documentary, Recollection, ‘Re-enactment’ and Temporality
Source:
Drawn from Life
Author(s):

Paul Ward

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748694112.003.0005

In this chapter Paul Ward focuses particularly on the concept of re-enactment, arguing that it raises varied questions about the nature of performance, agency, point of view and temporality within animated documentary. Ward grounds his theoretical speculations and conceptual distinctions in close readings of two animated documentaries, Andersartig (2011) and The Children of the Holocaust (2014), both of which depict individual childhood memories of living in Nazi-era Germany. He concludes that works such as these encourage audiences and critics alike to understand and engage with animated documentary as a filmmaking mode able to portray intangible, often non-indexical (and therefore un-photographable) documentary phenomena.

Keywords:   animated documentary, re-enactment, recollection, temporality, performance, agency, Andersartig (2011), The Children of the Holocaust (2014), intangible

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