Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
From Film Practice to Data ProcessProduction Aesthetics and Representational Practices of a Film Industry in Transition$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Sarah Atkinson

Print publication date: 2018

Print ISBN-13: 9780748693580

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748693580.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 04 August 2021

Digital Film Production Preservation and Access

Digital Film Production Preservation and Access

Chapter:
(p.178) Chapter 6 Digital Film Production Preservation and Access
Source:
From Film Practice to Data Process
Author(s):

Sarah Atkinson

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748693580.003.0006

This chapter examines digital film production preservation and access in the moment of the ‘Digital Dilemma’and the attendant challenges to the archiving of digital film which are summarised as reliability, vulnerability, volume and data complexity. Different archival paradigms are considered including film, born digital and hybrid, and the associated archival aesthetics, drawing from various branches of enquiry within archival studies. This includes considerations of Sally Potter’s own online, interactive archive SP-ARK – whereby all film/analogue was digitised – and the archival structure developed by the Deep Film Access Project (DFAP) – designed to accommodate both film, data and hybrid assets. The chapter contends that archival structures support and replicate auteurism leading to omissions and occlusions of both personnel and practices. Evidence is provided to demonstrate that the way in which an archive is conceived, shaped and organised captures the various ‘aesthetics of production’ and ‘Production Aesthetics’ of a moment in time, as well as its concomitant ‘production legacy aesthetics’, ‘archival legacy aesthetics’ and embedded paradoxes of representation.

Keywords:   Film archive, Digital film, Digital dilemma, Archive aesthetics, Archival legacy aesthetics, Sally Potter, SP-ARK

Edinburgh Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.