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American Postfeminist CinemaWomen, Romance and Contemporary Culture$
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Michele Schreiber

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780748693368

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2014

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748693368.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 28 March 2020

. Independence Vs. Dependence

. Independence Vs. Dependence

Economics in the Postfeminist Cycle

Chapter:
(p.140) 5. Independence Vs. Dependence
Source:
American Postfeminist Cinema
Author(s):

Michele Schreiber

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748693368.003.0006

Chapter Five focuses on the work of two of the most prominent writer-directors of the postfeminist period, Nancy Meyers and Nicole Holofcener, arguing that there are illuminating connections to be found between the representation of romance in their films It’s Complicated(2009) and Friends With Money(2006) and the industrial context in which they work. Meyers combines a satisfying romantic catharsis alongside the normalization of consumption while Holofcener deviates from typical romantic structures and calls attention to what lies beneath acts of consumption. By illustrating that “having it all” can mean different things to different women (both real and fictional), these two case studies reveal the elasticity of thestructural and discursive characteristics of the postfeminist romance film and the importance of female authorship to the cycle.

Keywords:   women filmmakers, Nancy Meyers, Nicole Holofcener, independent cinema, consumption

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