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In Secrecy's ShadowThe OSS and CIA in Hollywood Cinema 1941-1979$
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Simon Willmetts

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780748692996

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748692996.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 20 October 2019

The Facts of War: Cinematic Intelligence and the Office of Strategic Services

The Facts of War: Cinematic Intelligence and the Office of Strategic Services

Chapter:
(p.22) 1. The Facts of War: Cinematic Intelligence and the Office of Strategic Services
Source:
In Secrecy's Shadow
Author(s):

Simon Willmetts

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748692996.003.0001

This chapter tells the story of the OSS Field Photographic Unit (FPU) and its impact on American cinema and society. Led by the legendary Hollywood film director John Ford, the FPU produced training, reconnaissance and propaganda films for the CIA’s wartime predecessor. In doing so, it is argued here, they made a significant contribution to what theorist Paul Virilio termed “the logistics of perception”, or the ways and means by which war is perceived. By helping to transform the second-hand experience of war from a predominantly textual to a mostly visual experience, the FPU left a profound legacy.

Keywords:   John Ford, Office of Strategic Services, OSS, Field Photographic Unit, Paul Virilio, Nuremberg Trials, Nazi War Crimes, Combat Film, Combat Photography

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