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Kings, Lords and Men in Scotland and Britain, 1300–1625Essays in Honour of Jenny Wormald$
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Steve Boardman

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780748691500

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748691500.001.0001

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‘We Bund and Obleiss Us Never More to Querrell’: Bonds, Private Obliga tions and Public Justice in the Reign of James VI1

‘We Bund and Obleiss Us Never More to Querrell’: Bonds, Private Obliga tions and Public Justice in the Reign of James VI1

Chapter:
(p.173) Chapter 8 ‘We Bund and Obleiss Us Never More to Querrell’: Bonds, Private Obliga tions and Public Justice in the Reign of James VI1
Source:
Kings, Lords and Men in Scotland and Britain, 1300–1625
Author(s):

Anna Groundwater

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748691500.003.0009

This chapter explores the process of bonding during the reign of James VI, and the complex set of motivations, including obligations of kinship, allegiance and lordship, which helped to secure co-operation with the law. In a time of the crown’s unprecedented intolerance of violent crime, and the intensification of government that Scotland experienced under James, it is suggested that, whilst there was an increasing emphasis on formal public procedures to resolve disputes, early modern government continued to use traditional methods, such as bonding, to implement the newly registered laws. Formal public justice thus continued to utilise the informal mechanisms provided by ‘private’ justice, and the socio-political structures of authority formed by traditional lordship and a kin-based society, blurring any division between the concept and practice of public and private justice. The very bonding of society itself continued to facilitate the objectives of a newly intrusive crown.

Keywords:   justice, arbitration, law, lordship, James VI

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