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Writing for The New YorkerCritical Essays on an American Periodical$
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Fiona Green

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780748682492

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748682492.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM EDINBURGH SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.edinburgh.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Edinburgh University Press, 2021. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in ESO for personal use.date: 03 August 2021

The New Yorker, the Middlebrow, and the Periodical Marketplace in 1925

The New Yorker, the Middlebrow, and the Periodical Marketplace in 1925

Chapter:
(p.17) Chapter 1 The New Yorker, the Middlebrow, and the Periodical Marketplace in 1925
Source:
Writing for The New Yorker
Author(s):

Faye Hammill

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748682492.003.0001

This chapter focuses on The New Yorker in its first year, exploring its mediation of the whole range of the city's print culture. Balancing between fascination and ironic detachment in its attitude to the celebrity gossip and sensation disseminated in the tabloids, and similarly in its attitude to the high culture disseminated in avant garde and smart magazines, The New Yorker adopted an intermediate position which affiliates it with middlebrow culture. The chapter shows how, as multiauthored collages, incorporating a diverse mix of content and evolving over time, magazines are always difficult to position in relation to cultural hierarchies. The New Yorker, for example, has been classed, in different critical accounts, as modernist, as mass market, and as middlebrow.

Keywords:   The New Yorker, print culture, celebrity gossip, tabloids, smart magazine, middlebrow culture, magazines

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