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Enlightenment, Legal Education, and CritiqueSelected Essays on the History of Scots Law, Volume 2$
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John W. Cairns

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780748682133

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748682133.001.0001

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A Note on The Bride of Lammermoor: Why Scott did not Mention the Dalrymple Legend until 1830

A Note on The Bride of Lammermoor: Why Scott did not Mention the Dalrymple Legend until 1830

Chapter:
(p.424) 15 A Note on The Bride of Lammermoor: Why Scott did not Mention the Dalrymple Legend until 1830
Source:
Enlightenment, Legal Education, and Critique
Author(s):

John W Cairns

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748682133.003.0015

This chapter examines issues of the Scots law on marriage in Sir Walter Scott's novel, The Bride of Lammermoor. As first published in 1819, The Bride of Lammermoor opened with Peter Pattieson's account of the life of Dick Tinto, a painter, and of their discussions on the respective merits of narrative in the novel and in the pictorial arts. Neither Tinto nor Pattieson — nor, for that matter, Jedediah Cleishbotham as editor — referred to the story of the unfortunate Janet Dalrymple. The chapter argues that what restrained Scott in 1819 from mentioning the legend of the marriage of Janet Dalrymple were the severe and well-publicised marital problems of John William Henry Dalrymple, who was to succeed in 1821 as seventh Earl of Stair. It also considers a court case which illustrated the problems Scott perceived and also affected his discussion of The Bride of Lammermoor.

Keywords:   marriage, Sir Walter Scott, The Bride of Lammermoor, Scots law, Janet Dalrymple, John William Henry Dalrymple, court case

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