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Law, Lawyers, and HumanismSelected Essays on the History of Scots Law, Volume 1$
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John W Cairns

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780748682096

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: January 2018

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748682096.001.0001

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Legal Study in Utrecht in the late 1740s: The Education of Sir David Dalrymple, Lord Hailes

Legal Study in Utrecht in the late 1740s: The Education of Sir David Dalrymple, Lord Hailes

Chapter:
(p.253) 10 Legal Study in Utrecht in the late 1740s: The Education of Sir David Dalrymple, Lord Hailes*
Source:
Law, Lawyers, and Humanism
Author(s):

John W Cairns

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748682096.003.0010

This chapter considers the experience of one Scottish student in the Netherlands, specifically the education of Sir David Dalrymple, third Baronet of Hailes (1726–1792). Unusually for a Scots lawyer of his era, he was educated at Eton and was admitted to the Middle Temple on August 8, 1744. In 1745 he moved to study at the University of Utrecht, remaining there until 1747. After public defence of his theses on February 20, 1748, he was admitted to the Faculty of Advocates in Edinburgh on February 24. He was elevated to the Bench of the Court of Session in 1766, taking the judicial title of Lord Hailes. In 1776 he was also appointed one of the Commissioners of the Justiciary Court. Hailes is best remembered, however, for his work as an historian, particularly of the Middle Ages in Scotland.

Keywords:   law students, David Dalrymple, Scots law, Netherlands, law school, legal education, University of Utrecht

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