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Cinematicity in Media History$
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Jeffrey Geiger and Karin Littau

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780748676118

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: May 2014

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748676118.001.0001

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Cinema, Video, Game: Astonishing Aesthetics and the Cinematic ‘Future’ of Computer Graphics’ Past

Cinema, Video, Game: Astonishing Aesthetics and the Cinematic ‘Future’ of Computer Graphics’ Past

Chapter:
(p.172) (p.173) Chapter 10 Cinema, Video, Game: Astonishing Aesthetics and the Cinematic ‘Future’ of Computer Graphics’ Past
Source:
Cinematicity in Media History
Author(s):

Leon Gurevitch

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748676118.003.0011

This chapter, written by Leon Gurevitch, considers intersections between the cinematic and game aesthetics. Rather than interrogate the implications of the predominance of photorealism in game aesthetics, Gurevitch asks why notions of the cinematic have often been, and continue to be, so important to commentators, games makers and players alike. His chapter not only problematizes the simplifications upon which the comparison between cinema and games has often rested, but asserts that notions of the ‘cinematic’ are now being redrawn by production techniques and consumption practices of the games industry, rather than the other way around. With special effects studios increasingly deploying game engines as pre-visualization tools, and motion capture, animation, and compositing teams entering the cinema industry from games studios, the material practices and visual cultures that constitute the cinematic are being reconfigured. The issue, then, is not one of just how cinematic games have become, but how the cinematicity of gaming is expanding notions of the cinematic.

Keywords:   Cinema aesthetics, Photorealism, Gaming, Digital effects, Game theory, Media history, Comparative media

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