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Small-Gauge StorytellingDiscovering the Amateur Fiction Film$
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Ryan Shand and Ian Craven

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780748656349

Published to Edinburgh Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.3366/edinburgh/9780748656349.001.0001

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. Occupying A Distinguished But Lonely Place in the Amateur Movement: Ace Movies 1929 to 1964

. Occupying A Distinguished But Lonely Place in the Amateur Movement: Ace Movies 1929 to 1964

Chapter:
(p.124) (p.125) 5. Occupying A Distinguished But Lonely Place in the Amateur Movement: Ace Movies 1929 to 1964
Source:
Small-Gauge Storytelling
Author(s):

Francis Dyson

Publisher:
Edinburgh University Press
DOI:10.3366/edinburgh/9780748656349.003.0006

This chapter considers the activities of the London-based cine club Ace Movies, which was founded in 1929 and continued in operation well into the 1960s. As a relatively high-profile group within British cine culture, Ace was portrayed in its later years as an exemplary club in terms of resources and organisation, but also as adopting a distinctive approach to film-making, deemed highly appropriate to amateur circumstances. Epitomising the ‘serious’ creative possibilities of amateur filmmaking, the Ace Movies ‘house style’ was sometimes associated with developments in European art cinema and frequently rewarded with competition-recognition, both in national and international arenas. Scrutiny of post-war sources suggests that for many amateurs, the commitment to ‘silent’ practice persists stubbornly within the cine movement well beyond the practical viability of synchronised sound for small-gauge. Such residual perspectives are seen here both as informing the development of Ace’s particular studio culture, and as illustrating the persistence of 1930s amateur film-making ambitions more generally, through the 1950s and beyond.

Keywords:   Art cinema, Silent film, Film studios

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